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The PE Family Salutes Arrested Development
March 24th, 2017

This day in hip-hop pays tribute to the critically-acclaimed rap group Arrested Development. Among those lifting their hands in salutation is veteran rap supergroup, Public Enemy.

Initially released on March 24th 1992, Arrested Development's debut album entitled 3 Years, 5 Months & 2 Days in the Life Of... garnered landslide acclaim and applause for its stark contrast amidst an age wherein gangsta rap had become hip-hop's status quo.

While majority of rap giants during that time rose to prominence through the controversial explicits often criticized by many in that genre, Arrested Development chose to fashion their rhymes along the lines of peace, love, and spirituality. Adding humor to their mix, the group attests that the album's title refers to the excruciating wait it took obtaining a record deal.

Nevertheless, the group's first album attained both critical acclaim and a respectable list of awards and accolades, such as being voted as best album of the year in The Village Voice's Pazz & Jop critics' poll.

The sound itself projected a source of refreshment through innovative sounds, which often led critics to esteem the group through titles such as “the anti-gangsta” movement and “rap's most self-reflective act.”

Two decades and five years later, the band is still making music, with their latest release embodied with a new music video, which by the way, feels so right at such a time like this. Arrested Development had always been known for their refreshing sounds and positive messages, and the video and song fall nothing short of that.

By Jods Arboleda for PublicEnemy.com